Additional thought on Exxon Valdez – Going Past Exxon Crisis Communication

As I was sitting here contemplating writing my case study for the Haagan Daz and the Honey Bees, I began thinking about another very important public relations campaign that was tied to the Exxon Valdez oil spill.  This campaign, however is not one by Exxon themselves and reminds me in some ways of the Haagan Daz campaign.  When the oil spill took place, and their were massive animal rescue efforts taking place, it became common knowledge for average citizens that Dawn dish soap could effectively take the oil off the effected animals, including birds, seals, etc.  Dawn created a massive public relations (and in essence, sales) campaign from that knowledge.  The began massive rescue effort campaigns and promoted the well being of animals in Alaska.  As I said, I thought of this while contemplating the Haagan Daz case, however I tend to constantly think of more than one problem at any given point, so I was also thinking about the fact that my dogs needed to have flea medicine put on them.  I typically always give them a bath using Dawn dish soap before applying flea medicine.  Why?  Because it is common knowledge that Dawn will kill the fleas and get any deep down dirt out of their fur.  Why is this common knowledge?  Because when the Exxon Valdez oil spill took place, Dawn made sure its benefits to animal lovers was common knowledge, making them one of the most used dish soap brands, not for doing dishes, but for cleansing our beloved fury (or feathered) friends. To this day, Dawn puts a symbol on its bottles stating “Dawn helps save wildlife” and many of their bottles have larger pictures of birds, seals, or other animals.  Just like the Haagan Daz case, brilliant use of crisis communication when the crisis is not necessarily theirs.  Just an interesting public relations thought I had this morning and thought I would share.  Any other thoughts?

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